HD Thoreau: The Original MGTOW

The only obligation which I have a right to assume is to do at any time what I think right. -Henry David Thoreau

Though Thoreau, as far as I am aware, was not one for swooping fly ladies, he ought for any number of reasons be held up as the proto-manospherian, and certainly the proto-MGTOW.

Most people familiar with Thoreau will likely have read Walden and little else.  This is a shame.  For all that is good in Walden is hardly a pale to the brilliant light the emanates his other works. Whether one reads from his journals those musings which struck him on his daily woodland walks or his passes through the heights of Greek thought, or for that matter, Eastern thought, he must be struck by the fierce independence, the absolute break between Thoreau and the herd of the sheeple.

There is on occasion the random outcry in the Manosphere: Yes, it is bad, but what shall we do? What can be done?  Thoreau has the answer.  Be a wrench in the cogs, conform not to this state of things, go your own way in your own way by your own steam.

Were I so inclined I could have easily quoted Civil Disobedience in its entirety and appended it to this little snippet.  It is that worth reading that I would have quoted it twice.

I HEARTILY ACCEPT THE MOTTO, — “That government is best which governs least”; and I should like to see it acted up to more rapidly and systematically. Carried out, it finally amounts to this, which also I believe, — “That government is best which governs not at all”; and when men are prepared for it, that will be the kind of government which they will have. Government is at best but an expedient; but most governments are usually, and all governments are sometimes, inexpedient. The objections which have been brought against a standing army, and they are many and weighty, and deserve to prevail, may also at last be brought against a standing government. The standing army is only an arm of the standing government. The government itself, which is only the mode which the people have chosen to execute their will, is equally liable to be abused and perverted before the people can act through it. . .

Must the citizen ever for a moment, or in the least degree, resign his conscience to the legislator? Why has every man a conscience, then? I think that we should be men first, and subjects afterward. It is not desirable to cultivate a respect for the law, so much as for the right. The only obligation which I have a right to assume is to do at any time what I think right. . .

All machines have their friction; and possibly this does enough good to counterbalance the evil. At any rate, it is a great evil to make a stir about it. But when the friction comes to have its machine, and oppression and robbery are organized, I say, let us not have such a machine any longer. In other words, when a sixth of the population of a nation which has undertaken to be the refuge of liberty are slaves, and a whole country is unjustly overrun and conquered by a foreign army, and subjected to military law, I think that it is not too soon for honest men to rebel and revolutionize. What makes this duty the more urgent is the fact that the country so overrun is not our own, but ours is the invading army. . .

All voting is a sort of gaming, like checkers or backgammon, with a slight moral tinge to it, a playing with right and wrong, with moral questions; and betting naturally accompanies it. The character of the voters is not staked. I cast my vote, perchance, as I think right; but I am not vitally concerned that that right should prevail. I am willing to leave it to the majority. Its obligation, therefore, never exceeds that of expediency. Even voting for the right is doing nothing for it. . .

Unjust laws exist; shall we be content to obey them, or shall we endeavor to amend them, and obey them until we have succeeded, or shall we transgress them at once? Men generally, under such a government as this, think that they ought to wait until they have persuaded the majority to alter them. They think that, if they should resist, the remedy would be worse than the evil. But it is the fault of the government itself that the remedy is worse than the evil. It makes it worse. . .

I have paid no poll-tax for six years. I was put into a jail once on this account, for one night; and, as I stood considering the walls of solid stone, two or three feet thick, the door of wood and iron, a foot thick, and the iron grating which strained the light, I could not help being struck with the foolishness of that institution which treated me as if I were mere flesh and blood and bones, to be locked up. I wondered that it should have concluded at length that this was the best use it could put me to, and had never thought to avail itself of my services in some way. I saw that, if there was a wall of stone between me and my townsmen, there was a still more difficult one to climb or break through, before they could get to be as free as I was. I did not for a moment feel confined, and the walls seemed a great waste of stone and mortar. I felt as if I alone of all my townsmen had paid my tax. They plainly did not know how to treat me, but behaved like persons who are underbred. In every threat and in every compliment there was a blunder; for they thought that my chief desire was to stand the other side of that stone wall. I could not but smile to see how industriously they locked the door on my meditations, which followed them out again without let or hindrance, and they were really all that was dangerous. . .

For the rest:

Civil Disobedience

Enjoy

Veritas numquam perit,
The Poet

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This entry was posted in Autodidacticism, Philosophy, Thoreau, Western Heritage and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to HD Thoreau: The Original MGTOW

  1. dicipres says:

    Great post and insights, will read more

  2. Pingback: La Boetie: Not Spanish For The Bowtie | Society of Amateur Gentlemen

  3. Interesting blog. I am a big Thoreau fan myself.

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